Florida man bought Lamborghini Huracán EVO, Rolex watches, and clothing designers fake pandemic loans

Valski Parusi, 27 (pictured) has been charged with five counts of electronic fraud, three counts of money laundering, and one count of aggravated identity theft.

Valski Parusi, 27 (pictured) has been charged with five counts of electronic fraud, three counts of money laundering, and one count of aggravated identity theft.

Federal prosecutors have charged a 27-year-old Haitian immigrant with fraud after he used illicit COVID relief funds to purchase millions of luxury goods such as the Lamborghini Huracán EVO, suits and watches designed by Rolex and Hublot.

Valeski Parusi, 27, sought more than $4.2 million in Paycheck Protection Program loans, falsifying prior year’s expenses, net profit, payroll and IRS tax forms on each application, according to the Department of Justice.

He earned approximately $2.1 million.

On December 29, Parusi made his first appearance in Federal Magistrates Court to face five counts of electronic fraud, three counts of money laundering, and one count of aggravated identity theft.

If convicted, he could face up to 132 years in prison.

Valski Parusi, 27, has boasted of his illicit fortune on social media.  According to the Department of Justice, he was fraudulently paid $2.1 million in Paycheck Protection Program loans

Valski Parusi, 27, has boasted of his illicit fortune on social media. According to the Department of Justice, he was fraudulently paid $2.1 million in Paycheck Protection Program loans

On social media, Barossi has dressed up as Louis Vuitton, Gucci and Chanel, describing himself as a success story with captions like

On social media, Barossi dressed up as Louis Vuitton, Gucci, and Chanel, describing himself as a success story with captions like “From homeless to soaring sky”, and “You don’t have to be great to start, start to be great”

On social media, Barossi dressed up as Louis Vuitton, Gucci, and Chanel, describing himself as a success story with captions like “From homeless to soaring sky”, and “You don’t have to be awesome to start, start being awesome.”

He claimed that when he moved to the United States four years ago, he was unable to purchase T-shirts at Walmart, as he worked in the store.

He became president of a company known as VBarosySolutions Inc. , or VBS, according to the federal indictment, which he said helped its clients fix poor credit scores.

“4 years ago I was broke, written and disgusted,” he wrote in one of the posts. “I couldn’t even put gasoline in my car or even buy a dollar menu at McDonald’s.”

I remember being insulted by the cashier at McDonald’s just because I didn’t have the extra 50 cents for sweet and sour sauce. And today, because of hard work and determination, we are featured in top publications like ABC, FOX, etc.

Barozi's obscure biographies online describe the scammer as

Barozi’s obscure online bio describes the scammer as a “7-person entrepreneur”, “creator of NFT” and an expert in “marketing and e-commerce”

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One of Parossi’s self-published “press releases” was titled “How This Haitian Businessman Turned Walmart To Disrupt The Million-Dollar Credit Repair Industry”

His obscure internet biography describes the fraudster as a “No. 7 Entrepreneur”, an “NFT Builder” and an expert in “Marketing and E-Commerce”.

One of his “press releases” was titled “How This Haitian Entrepreneur Turned Walmart To Disrupt The Million Dollar Credit Repair Industry.”

Parossi boasted of partnering with Financial Education Services Inc. , a company described by the Georgia attorney general as an “illegal credit repair company” that uses “illegal and deceptive practices in its multi-level marketing structure,” according to the Miami Herald.

That company paid a $1.75 million fine to the state of Georgia for its practices before changing its name to United Wealth Education.

Since the federal Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act was enacted on March 29, 2020, a group of fraudsters has been abusing the financial assistance provided by PPP.

The US Secret Service said, based on data from the Department of Labor and Small Business Administration, that nearly $100 billion has been stolen from COVID-19 relief programs set up to help businesses and people who have lost their jobs due to the pandemic.

Barossi, pictured, could face 132 years in prison if convicted

Barossi, pictured, could face 132 years in prison if convicted

The Miami Herald reports that South Florida, the country’s leading fraud capital, has led the wave of financial crime.

Those scams included a businessman who bought a $318,000 Lamborghini with PPP money, a nurse who lied about her business to buy a Mercedes-Benz lease and child support paying $474,000 in damages, and a North Miami couple who pretended to be farmers to spend $1 million in benefits. .

The COVID-19 Anti-Fraud Enforcement Task Force was created on May 17, 2021 in an effort to scam relief fund fraud.

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